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1. Introduction to convective weather

1.2.3. Updraft

Updraft The updraft of the thunderstorm is the convectivelly rising moist warm air. It is invisible to the eye below the condensation level and becomes...
1. Introduction to convective weather
1. Introduction to convective weather

1.2.3.2. Updraft depending on the wind

As you watch cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds forming on different days, you will notice on some days the updrafts grow vertically upwards, while on other...
1. Introduction to convective weather

1.2.3.3. Pileus cloud caps

Often, a white wispy cloud cap forms above rapidly rising updraft – a pileus cloud. It forms as moist, but stable air above a rapidly...
1. Introduction to convective weather
1. Introduction to convective weather

1.2.3.5. Overshooting top

Overshooting tops develop on thunderstorms that have particularly strong updrafts. Overshooting tops typically develop on Cumulonimbus capillatus incus clouds. The updraft punches through the equilibrium...
1. Introduction to convective weather
1. Introduction to convective weather

1.2.3.7. Mammatus clouds

Mammatus clouds form on the underside of a thunderstorm’s anvil. The name mammatus comes from the Latin word mamma, meaning “udder” or “breast”. They appear...
1. Introduction to convective weather